Intonation: Pythagorean Intonation


Intonation: Pythagorean Intonation
Use Pythagorean Intonation for melodies and scales.

11 Comments

  1. I understand just a little bit of english.. It would be great if someone
    makes good subtitules so a lot of spanish and latin american people can
    enjoy this…

  2. if thirds and sixths cannot be used with double stops, what about seconds
    and sevenths? I’m kind of new to this topic so forgive me my maybe naïve
    question. :)

  3. Both of the instances where you stated with a big STOP SIGN sounded alright
    to me. I’m a music producer, but I’m not really a musician. My knowledge
    about musical notes and chords are pretty much non existent, but I still
    believe that if something sounds good, it is perfectly fine to listen to.
    Wether you like it or not, well that’s a preference.

  4. Well, I think the point that the author of this video is making is that
    major & minor thirds in 12-note Pythagorean tuning sound exciting and vivid
    for *melodies* but not so wonderful on a violin timbre played as *vertical
    intervals.* We must bear in mind, however, that Pythagorean tuning comes in
    many forms: 5-note, 7-note, 17-note, 29-note, 41-note and 53-note
    Pythagorean. The 53 note Pythagorean tuning in particular sounds
    indistinguishable in a musical context from conventional 5-limit just
    intonation (which has 5/4 just major thirds that sound much nicer on the
    violin than the 81/64 maj 3rds of 12 note Pythagorean).

  5. This is the best explanation of Just intonation I have yet seen. The
    examples are perfectly played. People who cannot hear the striking
    differences in the examples are simply acclimated to accepting dodgy
    intonation due to a lifetime of hearing piano and guitar which are tuned
    purposely a little out of tune (ie: Equal temperement). Being able to play
    with perfect just intonation is one of the reasons why non-fretted
    instruments can sound so glorious (when performed by a master). Thank you
    Dr. Sassmannshaus for this great series.

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